ENDLESS LIST OF FAVOURITE PAIRINGS // Cesare & Lucrezia Borgia
↳ “Cesare? I would ask you something." - "Then ask and it is yours.” - “I would ask you to marry me." - "As you wish. My word is my word. We shall run away. Change our names, perhaps. Live out our days in some small fishing village by the coast. Where no one will ever guess who we once were.

(via fellowozian)


Karla Souza on the Late Show with Craig Ferguson

(Source: htgawm-gifs, via getawaywithgifs)


red-scrunchie-club asked: Laurel + Frank

(Source: fuckyeshtgawm, via notfranksgirl)


"She removes her wig, her eyelashes, her makeup, never breaking eye contact with the reflection of her natural self. It’s an intimate, powerful moment television doesn’t often show: A black woman removing all the elements white supremacy tells her she has to wear to be beautiful, successful, powerful." (x)

(Source: chriscolfer, via siliconesaline)


botanybaes:

American Horror Story has fucked with this dudes head

(Source: panic-at-the-discount-store, via iagoe)


abeautyinyourresistance:

all i want is an apartment in a city and a decent job, a dog, wifi and a tv, and someone to have sex with

(via oswaldimpossible)


Cesare’s character was bewildering in its contradictions: he was a brilliant student, a man of lucid intelligence, possessed of notorious charm and eloquence - ‘of his mind and his tongue he makes what use he wills’, wrote one despairing envoy of him. He was strong, athletic, an expert horseman and a skilful military leader. Even his enemies never denied his personal courage: ‘In war he was a good companion and a brave man,’ a French fellow officer wrote of him. He was also totally amoral, vengeful, treacherous and deceitful, ‘the great dissembler’ as Machiavelli described him, a man apparently incapable of deep and lasting human affection - except perhaps for his sister, Lucrezia. His complexities baffled even that acute observer Machiavelli, who saw the careful picture he had built up of Cesare shattered in an hour, so that he doubted whether it had been the truth or simply a mirage.

— Sarah Bradford, Cesare Borgia: His Life and Times (via goodnightmoon-goodnightspoon)

(via arthurshelbys)